Open Book

Hey there everyone!

Oh no, she’s back, what will we do? Well, exams are done with, I can stop panicking and begin thinking clearly again *rousing chorus of Hallelujah.* It also means I can get back to this with a bit more regularity – terrible as it feels skipping weeks, it’s either that or post something that makes no sense AND distract myself from my revision AND possibly have an all out meltdown. I hate the anxiety I get around my exams; I also genuinely need to give the rational thinking portion of my brain a pay rise – by this point it’s earned it.

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So this week, the plan was to talk about Guardians of the Galaxy 2 (which most of you ought to have seen, and I’d highly recommend it if you haven’t) and their autistic representation; however, World Mental Health Awareness Week was this week. Plenty of my friends have been doing cool things for it like webchats and articles and a favourite artist of mine released a music video based on recovery and relapse (here, if anyone’s interested –  I’m not taking any money for publicity, I just think it’s amazing), and to throw in my ten cents, I wanted to talk about books.

*Trigger warnings ahead for mention and discussion of self harm*

Trust me, it makes sense. I’ve been re-reading one of my favourite series this week to take my mind off the hideousness that is my research methods exam; Vampire Academy, by Richelle Mead (Goodreads Link). Before you all roll your eyes at yet another vampire romance fan and completely switch off – it’s not Twilight, it will never be Twilight, it is not even in the same league as Twilight. Fun fact – one main character has depression. Another fun fact – another has bipolar disorder. The way it’s handled here is that their mental disorders are intrinsically tied to the kind of magic they wield – psychic powers. Firstly, I love this because it lends the idea that awesome telepathic and healing powers should have consequences, which isn’t something I see a lot in young adult fiction. Secondly, it brings up a couple of things about mental health which I feel should be pointed out.

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Like many illnesses, mental illnesses and psychological disorders are not asked for. We can argue genetics and environmental stressors all we like, this fact remains immutable. There was a very cool article a few years ago which argued that depression was an allergic reaction to the world; whether there’s any true scientific background to this apart from this one study, I’m not sure, but it’s a very interesting concept. Regardless, neither Lissa nor Adrian can control or change the consequences their magic has, expect by cutting themselves off from it altogether, and this is mirrored in the real world. Regrettably, pills are not the quick fix for us mere mortals that they are for these Moroi, but there are very, very few people that can get out of mental illnesses without help. If you are one of those people, I salute you. But neither of them asked for this, and neither does anyone else struggling with mental health.

The second is the way it’s handled in popular media. The first book of the series (and there are six in total) was made into a film a couple of years ago – Vampire Academy, starring Zoey Deutch and Lucy Fry (can be found on Netflix) and like so many of these things, was really rushed and badly cut and would have been so much better as a TV series – hey, I criticise because I love. I think the biggest bone I had to pick was to do with Lissa’s self-harming, an issue close to my heart as some of you will know. In the book, her harming was a conscious decision, borne of depression brought on by a rare form of magic. For the film it was the same – except they cut out the conscious decision part, and had the cuts simply appear on her arm after magic use. Do not ask me why, to me it makes far more sense the book’s way, but maybe they’re trying to water it down for the poor little kids. Which gets to me.

I’m sure there are disorders where it does happen, but I, personally, have never known anyone with depression who just woke up one day having done awful things to themselves. As a rule, self harm is a conscious decision – maybe not a healthy decision, but a conscious one nonetheless. And I think dumbing it down for the sake of a target audience of young teenagers (13-16), at exactly the age that this could be becoming a concern for them, is a terrible idea. Numbers of under-18s presenting at A&E with self-inflicted injuries are rising (as of NHS figures October 2016), and as with many things, the more we talk and encourage talking about such things, the less this is likely to happen. Painting it as an unexpected consequence isn’t the most helpful thing on the planet; neither is Lissa’s best friend terming her a ‘freak’ when this happens.

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Yeah, I know, the whole ‘talk about it’ thing again. I’ve said before, talking about it is not the easiest thing in the world to do for someone with a mental illness. And why do you think that is? Nobody else will. There’s been a lot of talk in the last few years about teaching mental health in schools as part of PSHE (or whatever they’re calling it these days), and I think the more that mentally healthy people talk about it, and the more educated they get, the more comfortable people will become talking about their own issues. All we’re asking sometimes is a listening ear; a recent review quoted in the BPS Research Digest stated that the biggest factor in stopping self harming is family support. So dumbing it down or changing it’s emphasis in books and TV shows and films is maybe not the most helpful thing in the world.

Saying that, I have no idea how Vampire Academy got a 12 rating; mental illnesses aside, torture of minors and dead animals all over the place, anyone? My mum barely let me watch Titanic at that age, never mind Lord of the Rings or similarly violent things. And that was a PG.

Anyway, /rant.

I hope everyone’s had a good couple of weeks, and continues to have a good couple of weeks. One chapter ends, another begins…exams finish, project kicks in for real. Wish me luck.

Stay awesome everybody 😉

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Book

Teacup

 

 

Review: A Boy Made of Blocks

*Will contain spoilers for the novel*

Evening everyone!

You know, there’s very little that’s more British than wishing for rain while the sun is shining in a clear blue sky. We are never happy with the weather.

Okay, there’s a good reason for it; we need to roll out the lumps in the horse’s fields and we can’t do it while the ground is like iron, which means I get to ride the quadbike, which is AWESOME. And I just realised how incredibly middle-class that sentence makes me sound. I am so sorry.

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It’s one of the many things you don’t have to worry about in Minecraft. The earth always breaks when you want it to, and it regularly rains like a bitch. If you don’t mind the odd zombie hanging around (or a skeleton, God I hate skeletons), it’s pretty idyllic. The very ground beneath your feet bends to your will, which is at least part of the appeal of it for Sam in Keith Stuart’s novel ‘A Boy Made of Blocks.’

Some scene setting; Sam is eight, and on the autistic spectrum. He’s fairly high-functioning, but he had his moments – a lot. Alex is his father, and is, to put it bluntly, a complete mess. Jody is his mother, and perpetually stuck in the middle. Sam likes to play Minecraft, and Alex eventually realises that it may be the only way he and his son can reliably communicate. There are some other characters which move in and out of the story as necessary, but I would say they are more central to Alex’s story arc than Sam’s.

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The book is based on the author’s experiences with his own son, and I think that real-world edge really shows through; it manages to be both very true-to-life and heartwarming novel. It’s told from Alex’s perspective, so we don’t get a lot of Sam’s psyche; nevertheless, despite the insider view, I spent the first half of it wanting to punch Alex in the face (sorry mate), and the second half of him yelling at him to sort his life out. I can’t really blame him, in some respects. We’ve all been there, on occasion – life falling to pieces, no idea what to do about it, and burying our heads rather than try. It isn’t an excuse for not trying, though. There comes a point, even when depressed, one has to say ‘enough,’ and I think Alex was long past that stage – to the point I felt sometimes it was being milked for dramatic effect, but mental health issues aren’t overcome in a day, so Mr Stuart is forgiven. For now.

But I got so furious every time Alex got angry with Sam, whenever he shouted rather than tried to understand, whenever he gave up and snapped rather than tried to get down to Sam’s level, or Jody’s for that matter. Like he’d rather cause an argument because that’s what he’s expecting. There was a lot in the family dynamic that reminded me of growing up in my own household; not so much in terms of character personality, but in their interactions. It’s even true today, though these days my parents won’t even mention one another unless made to. It hit me quite hard in that area.

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No wonder Sam wants to run away and hide in a sandbox world. I did the same thing with storybooks. The same ones, over and over and over again, because they were predictable and therefore safe. I could deal with them. And Minecraft itself isn’t just a ‘run wild and free’ kind of game, even though you can build basically anything you want to. There are rules for it; all your recipes have to be exact or they won’t work, you can only pick up certain blocks if you break them with certain kinds of tools, certain things only spawn in certain places or biomes, it’s actually quite formulaic. You know what to expect. But there’s just enough freedom to make your own mark on the game. And okay, I can only really understand things once I’ve experienced them, that’s just the way I work, but I think the way it brought Sam out of his shell is actually quite accurate. In the same way I related (hah, still do) a lot of the world to what I read and saw in stories and films, Sam relates the real world to the virtual blocks of Minecraft, and in that way he starts to understand it. And so he starts to understand his dad, who starts to understand him, and it’s that understanding which starts to draw the family back together, in the end.

It was really beautifully done. And I guess that’s the point – if we don’t understand,or even try to understand, nothing will ever get better.

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Yeah, I guess it was one of those books which hit me in all the right places, even if the protagonist spent a lot of it annoying the hell out of me. And it portrays autism in a realistic light, rather than the overly positive or negative skews you can find depending on which media you access. Yes, I think it made a bit of a meal of Alex’s issues to try and create some drama and sympathy, but in terms of its portrayal of Sam and the spectrum, I thought it did a wonderful job of showing both the beauty and the strain. 9/10 would recommend to someone who was lowkey interested in the subject, or to someone looking for a starting point to learn about autsim.

Thanks for reading, and stay awesome!

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A Boy Made of Blocks (link to Amazon)

Minecraft (Mojang)

Diamond Pickaxe

Alex Skin

Are you sitting comfortably?

I hope so – I’m not. I hate racing bikes, but I think that’s a story for tomorrow.

Anyway. Erm, Introductions. Fellow bloggers of the interweb – firstly, hello, and welcome. My name is Hannah, I’m very very British, and I’d style myself as a polymath if my knowledge base wasn’t more of a rickety shelf of trivia than a well-stocked library. I’m first and foremost a horse-rider, but when I’m not doing that I’m a knitter, a writer, a bit of a gym rat, a follower of some really insane logic pathways, a consumate bookworm and a bit of a nerd.

Here you can expect to find…well, I don’t know right now. There’s a lot of things up here in my head: books, photographs, headcanons, thoughts and feelings on current events. I’m not sure I’ll ever be done sorting through it but I hope to unearth some gems along the way. Possibly some dragons too, but I’m making no promises. Erebor this isn’t.

Saying this, I have a few ground rules:

  1. Be respectful. I accept constructive criticism, but a simple ‘you suck’ is neither constructive nor criticism – you’re just being a douchebag (term used gender neutrally).
  2. On a related note, this is a tolerant blog. Queer-bashing, transphobia, sexism, racism, ablesim, and any other form of discrimination I can’t rattle off from the top of my head is not welcome here. Period. If you catch me doing one of those things – I assure you, it’s not deliberate, and please tell me; I’m still trying to learn the ropes.
  3. Have fun!

I am working this out as I go, so do bear with me while I find my feet. And lastly, don’t be afraid to say hello!

And I repeat: Are you sitting comfortably? Then we’ll begin.